Tea & Wine

TEA101 – Tea & Texture. Part 3

TEA101 – Tea & Texture. Part 3

Words we use to describe various degrees of astringency in tea and wine

LiuAn GuaPian

LiuAn GuaPian

I call this green tea Mr. Freshness. Its alter ego in wine is Roussanne.

TEA101 – Tea & Texture. Part 2

TEA101 – Tea & Texture. Part 2

The magic behind tea and wine texture is the work of tannins. Let’s learn some tannic secrets.

TEA101 – Tea & Heat

TEA101 – Tea & Heat

Temperature is key for wine. And twice as much for tea. Key facts you need to know in one post.

TEA101 – How Acid Is Your Tea?

TEA101 – How Acid Is Your Tea?

We rarely talk about acidity of tea. But it’s actually interesting. Learn the difference between fermentation and oxidation and how the latter affects the real and perceived acidity of tea.

Bai Mu Dan – Spring 2017

Bai Mu Dan – Spring 2017

This tea is so easy to recognise by its looks. In a cup, is extremely limpid and translucent, with an aroma of freshly cut juicy peach, aromatic herbs, wild flowers. Even when you drink this tea hot, it feels cool and refreshing. Take a sip!

TEA101 – Are We Tasting Or Smelling?

TEA101 – Are We Tasting Or Smelling?

Are we tasting or smelling? Both. And the smell turns out to be much more important… A few useful Infographics.

ZhengShan Xiao Zhong – Lapsang Souchong

ZhengShan Xiao Zhong – Lapsang Souchong

This tea enjoys much more hype overseas than in China. Overseas, even people with very little knowledge about Chinese tea, would usually quote this one. I have mixed feelings about it: like it, but find it a bit unsophisticated… let’s see why.

TEA101 – Tasting Language: Direct & Indirect

TEA101 – Tasting Language: Direct & Indirect

Making sense of tea means, among other things, learning to better talk about the experience of tea tasting. Here again, we can borrow some wisdom from the world of wine. Below are some ideas from the book “Wine: A tasting course” by Marnie Old. Basically, […]

AnHua HeiCha

AnHua HeiCha

This tea is masculine in the best possible way: hot and cool at the same time. Crazy looks, but who cares? – now that we know this guy better, we have completely succumbed to his unique charm.

Shu Pu’er – Yiwu Mountain – 2005

Shu Pu’er – Yiwu Mountain – 2005

To me, the only way to enjoy Shu Pu is to accept that it is NOT a substitute for an older, naturally aged Sheng Pu and to appreciate Shu Pu for its own undeniable qualities. Let’s pair it with some good food and music!